Duties of the Father of the Bride

(Part Four of Four: The Actual Wedding Day)

Day of Duties for the Father of an LDS bride

Photo Courtesy of Ravenberg Photograph

The traditional duties of the Father of the Bride During the actual Wedding and Reception day include:

1. Maintain a calm and loving tone, in spite of tension, chaos, last minute pre-wedding jitters, and problem solving.
2. Offer to help out on follow-up calls, running errands for your wife and daughter, and anything else that helps ease the tension for your daughter and your wife.
3. If this going to be a do-it-yourself (DIY) wedding, ensure that you or someone else pick up the essential items such as: decorations, wedding reception food (at place such as Costco, Wal Mart, or local deli), chairs, linens, flowers, and anything else that is needed for the wedding or the wedding reception and transfer them to the appropriate site.
4. Be ready to solve any problems that arise with any of the professional wedding vendors such as: wedding planner, wedding venue, caterer, photographer, linen rentals, table and chair rentals, table covers and chair covers, wedding florist, music vendors or DJ.

Official FOB Duties at the Wedding and Wedding Reception

Father of the LDS bride

Photo Courtesy of Amelia Lyon Photography

1. If the LDS wedding will not be held at the temple, the Father of the Bride will escort his daughter down the aisle and “give her away” to the groom
2. The Father of the Bride (and the Mother of the Bride) are the Official Hosts for the entire Wedding and wedding reception.
3. The Father of the Bride (and the Mother of the Bride) are the Official Hosts for the Wedding Reception line.
4. The Father of the Bride will give a Speech (or at least a toast) during the dinner or reception. (As part of the Father of the Bride speech he should specifically toast the bride and groom with a lasting love, long life, and good health). After the FOB’s speech, then the Groom, followed by his Best Man, will give their speech or toast.
5. The Father of the Bride will dance with his newly married daughter at the wedding reception (which could a Waltz, Fox Trot, Quick Step, or Western) the traditional dance is usually a Waltz. Don’t panic – this is not a dancing competition. Just a special time with your daughter.

Father of an LDS bride dancing with his daughter

Photo Courtesy of JarvieDigital.com

6. If this was a do-it-yourself (DIY) wedding, you should offer to help to return essential items such as: decorations, tables, chairs, linens, chaffing dishes, flowers, and anything else that were needed for the wedding or the wedding reception. Or, help coordinated those who will return them. Make sure that all bridal gifts are removed from the reception hall.
7. The Father of the Bride should ensure that all bills for which he was responsible are accounted for, reviewed, and paid.

Father of an LDS bride; father-daughter dance

Photo Courtesy of Ravenberg Photography

8. If necessary, the Father of the Bride should ensure that all the out of town guests have adequate transportation back to the airport.
9. See that the bride and groom are safely off on the way to their honeymoon.
10. Stop and give your wife a long warm hung.
11. Return his tuxedo to the tux shop, if applicable.
12. Plan a special dinner with only your wife and you. She’ll have lots of feelings and things to talk about after the wedding. This will be a great time for a special celebration for the two of you to relax, enjoy, and decompress.

Special note for LDS Father of the Bride:

If an LDS Cultural Hall was used for the wedding reception, The Father of the Bride should make sure that is cleaned, empty, and the building is locked up. You will need to return the keys or have some meet you at the building.

♥ Dr. Howard Edward Haller
Exclusively for WeddingLDS.com
Copyright © 2010 WeddingLDS.com. All rights reserved.

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